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F.A.Q.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Who is the Alaska Carbon Exchange (ACE)?
  2. What is an ACE Carbon Sequestration Credit?
  3. Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA)
  4. Alaska Native Corps. are a part of the Tribe
  5. What am I buying and what is an ACE LUA?
  6. What is Terrestrial Sequestration, and how does it affect Global Climate Change

1. Who is the Alaska Carbon Exchange (ACE)?

ACE, as a company, is a compilation of individuals interested in reducing greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere to positively impact Global Climate Change. ACE, as a web resource, is a web based management & marketing system used to manage, market, and sell the carbon sequestration value of tracts of Alaskan land under an ACE Land Usage Agreement. We are using the internet and our position in the Alaskan Native community to protect Native land for the purpose of fighting Global Climate Change.

  • Land Owners- our land owners are the Alaska Native Corporations (ANCs) set up by ANCSA to administer corporate benefit to its shareholders
  • Alaska Village Initiatives (AVI)
    • AVI has an advantageous position to bring opportunity to the Native community due to the strong relationship with its members who own the land, and based on the many years of work in conservation and wildlife management, it is a perfect fit with AVI’s mission and recent work
      • Tribal Conservation Districts
      • PLWM & Village Wildlife Conservation Consortium
      • Economic Development
      • Conservation Easements
  • Carbon Oz
    • Carbon Oz, which includes members from many different fields of work, originally came to AVI with the business model concept and prototype website for Alaska Carbon Exchange. Together, we created the Alaska Carbon Exchange as you see it now.
2. What is an ACE Carbon Sequestration Credit?

An ACE Carbon Credit is a certificate of 1 metric ton of carbon sequestered on lands protected by an ACE LUA

3. Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA)

ANCSA provides for the conveyance of both property title and monetary award to Alaskan Natives in settlement of their aboriginal claims to Alaskan lands. The act transferred titles to twelve Alaska Native regional corporations and over 200 local village corporations, and a thirteenth regional corporation was later created for Alaska Natives who no longer resided in Alaska. The act is codified as 43 U.S.C. 1601 et sec.

4. Alaska Native Corps. are a part of the Tribe

The goal of ANCSA was a successful alternative to the failed reservation system that our lower 48 (continental U.S.) cousins had endured, in which most were removed from their ancestral lands, and relocated into remote lands of the continental U.S. For ANCSA tribes, tribal members are now shareholders and/or descendants of the original shareholders of the village and regional corporations representing their village. ANCs must provide the corporate benefit to all shareholders equally and not all shareholders are located in the village that they are from. ACE revenue allows for corporate benefit to be shared among all the village’s shareholders in the traditional context of protecting and caring for the land and sharing the benefit with the whole village (shareholder base).

5. What am I buying and what is an ACE LUA?

As a State of Alaska Corporation, ANCSA Corporations have the mandated mission to provide benefit to their shareholders. As a form of providing corporate/traditional benefit, ACE holds the development rights of Alaska Native lands to protect their environmental integrity for the purpose of terrestrial sequestration to combat Climate Change. We accomplish this by setting up a land use agreement to allow traditional use of the land that won’t affect the carbon sequestration value and designates it as non-development. To hold the development rights of the land is to protect the use by only allowing for the traditional uses.

6. What is Terrestrial Sequestration, and how does it affect Global Climate Change

Terrestrial sequestration involves the capture and long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in plants and in the soil. During photosynthesis, carbon from the atmospheric CO2 is transformed into components necessary for plants to live and grow: a leaf, stem, root, etc. As part of this process, the carbon becomes part of the plant and is stored in the soil.

Modern science shows that removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere helps slow Global Climate Change, by removing some of the gases (CO2) that are contributing to the climate warming. With the large tracts of land that Alaska Native Corporations hold, we at ACE are using our position in the Native community to have land under contract to make positive changes to the climate.